Parlando: The COC Blog

2/8/2016

In Conversation: Christine Goerke

 

On Wednesday, February 3, our Opera Insights series featured Christine Goerke, the opera world’s most sought-after Brünnhilde (currently starring in our production of Siegfried), in an intimate evening of conversation about her life and career. The host was recently retired Toronto Star theatre critic, Richard Ouzounian. Listen to their immensely entertaining and candidly revealing conversation here!

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Posted by COC Staff / in Siegfried / comments (0) / permalink

2/5/2016

COC GENERAL DIRECTOR ALEXANDER NEEF’S PRE-PERFORMANCE SPEECH AT OPENING NIGHT OF THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO

 

Before the performance of The Marriage of Figaro on February 4, 2016, Canadian Opera Company General Director Alexander Neef shared some thoughts celebrating the freedom we have to create and enjoy the arts and the privilege to live in a country like Canada. Included in his remarks was the news of the beginning of an initiative providing access to refugees and newcomers to Canada to COC dress rehearsals and performances.

The program is still in its infancy but is moving forward and we wanted to make our intentions known.  The timing was such that it was appropriate to share at the opening night of Figaro.  More details about the development of this new initiative will be forthcoming as plans progress.

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Posted by COC Staff / in Canadian Opera Company / comments (0) / permalink

2/1/2016

10 Things to Know: The Marriage of Figaro

 

1) Controversial source material

Mozart and Da Ponte’s opera is based on the play, La folle journée, ou Le Mariage de Figaro (completed in 1781, performed in 1784) by Pierre Beaumarchais, which was quite a controversial work. Written in 1781, it was banned in France by King Louis XVI, even though his wife Marie-Antoinette loved it. Louis was concerned about the play’s political message: the protagonist Figaro’s speeches suggested the aristocracy was corrupt, prone to abuses of power, and ultimately an illegitimate form of social organization. If that wasn’t enough, the play was also open to charges of immorality and licentiousness due to its sexual content. With all those ingredients in the mix, it is perhaps not surprising that when it was finally given a public performance in France in 1784, it was an enormous success and quickly became the most popular play of the 18th century.

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Posted by Nikita Gourski / in Marriage of Figaro / comments (0) / permalink

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Sara Fulgoni in the COC production of Bluebeard's Castle. Photo: Michael Cooper © 2001

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